How can health science librarians get involved in big data?

The following reflection was written for the online class Big Data in Healthcare: Exploring Emerging Roles, a fantastic free course provided by the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM).

Enormous data sets containing a broad variety of information produced at high velocity are transforming the healthcare field.  This “big data” is being used for clinical research, patient diagnosis and treatment, analysis of public health trends, and in many other innovative ways to move healthcare into a new era of highly personalized medicine.  Patients provide the health data, programmers and data scientists create new tools to manipulate the data, and clinicians and other healthcare professionals consult and analyze the data.  Health science librarians may wonder what roles they can play in this daunting but incredibly important new domain.  Librarians can use their specialized skills to fill three key roles in the big data field: they can act a liaisons between healthcare professionals and programmers, they can act as advocates for patients, and they can act as educators for patients and healthcare professionals.

Librarians regularly perform reference interviews and user needs assessments to determine the information and programming needs of their patrons, and these skills can help librarians become effective liaisons between healthcare professionals and programmers who create tools to manipulate big data.  In the presentation The Triple Aim at the Front Lines: Lessons from a VA Experience in using data to drive change, Dr. Nick Meo describes how in order to create more effective data tools for physicians, programmers need to know how frontline physicians are using these tools in their everyday practice.  Librarians can be the intermediaries in this situation.  After performing reference interviews, focus groups, and other forms of needs assessments with healthcare professionals, the librarian can then work with programmers to create data tools that fit the information needs and diagnostic/treatment processes of the healthcare team.

Librarians can also act as advocates for patients, by learning about patient concerns related to use of their personal health data and communicating these concerns to both the programmers and healthcare professionals.  In the article A ‘green button’ for using aggregate patient data at the point of care, Christopher Longhurst, Robert Harrington, and Nigam Shah suggest a change to HIPAA, so that it will be “acceptable for front-line clinicians to use aggregate patient data, even if identified, for the purpose of treating a similar patient under their care” (1233).  This idea may make aggregated patient data more easily accessible to clinicians, but how would patients feel about their personal health data being used in this manner?  Librarians can work with patients to gain their viewpoints on possible new uses for health data like the suggested “green button”, and patients may reveal ethical, privacy, or security concerns that programmers and healthcare professionals had not previously considered.

Finally, librarians can act as educators for both healthcare professionals and patients to demonstrate the value of utilizing big data in healthcare. Harlan Krumholz describes in the article Big data and new knowledge in medicine: the thinking, training, and tools needed for a learning health system how healthcare professionals will need to change their viewpoints about best practices for research in order to fully embrace big data.  Librarians can begin changing viewpoints by presenting healthcare professionals with concrete examples of how big data has been used to improve patient care, as well as training resources for learning more about data science.  Librarians can also promote participation for patients within big data initiatives, by explaining how the projects will benefit public health.  For instance, librarians can explain to patients and the general public how participation in the All of Us Research Program may improve personalized medicine for current and future generations.

Health science librarians don’t need advanced programming skills or a medical degree as a prerequisite to work with big data.  Librarians already possess valuable communication and training skills which will make them effective liaisons between patients, healthcare professionals, and programmers who contribute to generating, analyzing, and creating tools for big data.

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Deciphering Buzzwords and Acronyms

 

question-mark-note-man-person-460868 (2)Today I came across an article on DigitalGov describing the hot new IT buzzwords for 2017, and reading it, I felt equal parts impressed and irritated.  It’s fantastic that technology is moving fast enough that we have to constantly innovate with language to describe the newest process or concept that’s taking the IT world by storm. On the other hand, overuse of buzzwords can make discussions between professionals turn into incomprehensible gibberish for anyone not fully immersed in the field.  This can hamper collaboration across different fields, if we literally can’t understand what the other person is saying. I know I’m not the only person irritated by buzzwords, since buzzword bingo and the Business Buzzword Generator exist.

And don’t even get me started on acronyms…if you’ve worked with any government organization, in academia, or in pretty much any professional field, you’re probably drowning in a SEA of acronyms. Yes, acronyms are definitely needed (who wants to constantly repeat “United States Patent and Trademark Office,” instead of USPTO?), but that doesn’t mean they don’t drive me crazy.

So how can we go about deciphering buzzwords and acronyms?  Google is a good place to start for buzzwords, and Wikipedia offers a handy article listing education, business, science/technology, political, and general conversation buzzwords.  For the library sciences field in particular, many academic LibGuides (see DTS, Cornell, Lesley) offer glossaries of common library and research terms. A great article by John Kupersmith describes best practices for translating research/library terminology for patrons, to improve service and reduce miscommunication.

For acronyms, I usually try a quick search of Acronym Finder or Free Dictionary.  A search of USPTO, for instance, on either site will immediately identify “United States Patent and Trademark Office” as the most likely meaning.  Both sites also list possible alternate definitions for less unique acronyms (like SEA, which has 114 possible meanings listed on Acronym Finder).  If you’re specifically looking for definitions of government acronyms, you also might want to try the GovSpeak Libguide from UC San Diego.

Acronyms and buzzwords are both necessary evils, since we need words for new ideas and shorthand for impossibly long agency names.  That doesn’t mean we should let buzzwords and acronyms hold us back, though…a quick online search will usually find a definition for even the most bizarre jargon.