May 2018 Library News Round-up: PubMed Data Filters, Data Management Webinars, and Staying Up-to-Date with MLA 2018

After a few exciting weeks of profiling incredible librarians from around the world, I’m relieved to return to familiar territory with a good ol’ fashioned news round-up.  For May 2018, I want to highlight a few interesting new data resources for librarians from National Library of Medicine (NLM) and the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM), including new data filters on PubMed and PubMed Central and an upcoming webinar series about research data management.  Also, there’s the equivalent of the Super Bowl for medical librarians coming up next week, the annual Medical Library Association (MLA) conference, this year in Atlanta, GA.  I unfortunately won’t be there in person this year, but I’ll follow along through Twitter and blogs.

PubMed Data Filters

On April 24, 2018, the NLM Technical Bulletin announced the ability to filter PubMed and PubMed Central search results to view articles that have associated data sets.  The NLM Technical Bulletin article describes the following data-related filtering options:

  • PubMed
    • Use  data[filter] to find citations with related data links in either the Secondary Source ID field or the LinkOut – Other Literature Resources field.
data
Data filter on PubMed.

Availability of related data sets is an important step towards improving reproducibility and transparency for research articles.  Hopefully these data-related filters will eventually be more prominently featured in the PubMed filter options (such as in the side-column list of filter options beside search results).

NNLM Research Data Management Webinar Series

The NNLM Research Data Management (RDM) webinar series is kicking off June 14, 2018, 2-3pm ET, with the free webinar Research Data Management Services: Beyond Analysis and Coding.  The presentation by Margaret Henderson, a Health Sciences Librarian at San Diego State University Library, will “show you how to start RDM services, even if you don’t feel confident about your statistical skills or knowledge of R.”

The NNLM RDM webinar series will be an ongoing bimonthly webinar series, with the aim to “support RDM within the library to better serve librarians and their institutional communities.”  I’m personally very excited about this series, since I’ve recently become interested in finding free online training resources related to research data management that are more geared towards information professionals (and less heavily focused on programming skills).  Once again, NNLM delivers with incredibly useful (and FREE!) online professional development resources.

MLA 2018 Resources

I won’t be at the annual MLA conference this year unfortunately (it was an incredible experience last year), but I can avoid fear of missing out (FOMO) thanks to a few helpful resources:

  • Twitter: I’ll definitely be following the #mlanet18 hashtag to learn some of the great insights other medical librarians are taking away from MLA speakers, sessions, and posters (especially the official MLA ’18 Tweeters).
  • Blogs: I’ll check the blog post summaries from the MLA’18 Blog Correspondents.

Have a great time if you’re going to MLA 2018, and remember to Tweet!

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Learning about Emerging Technologies for Libraries

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Image source: Pixabay

I’m always interested in learning about how new technology can be used to organize, locate, and share information in creative and innovative ways (since hey, librarians need to stay one step ahead of millennials and AI looking to put us out of a job).  I recently watched a recorded webinar from the Medical Library Association (MLA) called Scanning the Horizon: Emerging Technology at Your Library and in the Classroom, where Emily Hurst, AHIP, of Virginia Commonwealth University’s Tompkins-McCaw Library for the Health Sciences in Richmond discusses how librarians can stay on top of emerging technologies that may be used to improve library services.

Here are four free information resources I learned about during the webinar that I know I’ll be checking occasionally to keep informed about emerging technology trends:

  • Horizon Reports: The New Media Consortium (NMC) periodically publishes Horizon Reports that summarize emerging technology trends for libraries, museums, K-12, and higher education.  For instance, the 2017 Library Edition of the report identifies “Important Developments in Technology for Academic and Research Libraries” as Big Data, digital scholarship technologies, library services platforms, online identity, artificial intelligence, and the Internet of Things.
  • Gartner Hype Cycle: Hurst began the webinar by introducing the audience to the Gartner Hype Cycle, which tracks the “hype cycle” of emerging technologies.  Gartner, Inc. posts a chart of the Gartner Hype Cycle annually, with new technologies plotted at different points along the cycle’s trend line.  The 2017 Gartner Hype Cycle lists Smart Dust at the very beginning of the cycle, deep learning at the Peak of Inflated Expectations, augmented reality in the Trough of Disillusionment, and virtual reality headed up the Slope of Enlightenment.  More articles and commentary on emerging technologies can be found under the Trends section of the Gartner website.
  • EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative (ELI): ELI offers publications related to technology trends in higher education, such as the  7 Things You Should Know About…™ series that highlights popular new technologies like video walls, augmented reality/virtual reality, artificial intelligence, and more.
  • Library of the Future Blog: This blog from the American Library Association (ALA) was recommended by one of the attendees at the webinar. I especially like the weekly round-up of headlines (titled “Read for Later…”) related to emerging technology in libraries.

I’ll be adding these sites to my rotation of information resources I check regularly for library news. Other places where I normally learn about emerging technology trends in libraries include Twitter and from MLA conferences.

Librarians on Twitter: Hashtags, Twitter Chats, and Beyond

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I’ll admit it: I’m a few years behind the game with starting a personal-professional Twitter account.  I’ve used Twitter plenty for work over the years, but Tweeting to promote a brand or a website is different than Tweeting just to promote yourself and your own ideas. There is already a thriving Twitosphere of librarians out there, and it can be daunting to try to jump in and join the conversation.  Who should I follow?  What hashtags should I use?  Where can I find other medical librarians on Twitter?

Here are a few lessons learned while starting my new Twitter account, @jamornini:

So I guess I need to get Tweeting.  Maybe in the future (if I’m brave enough) I’ll follow the librarian community onto Instagram or Snapchat.  Social media is a brave new world, and librarians are constantly adapting to sharing information through the latest digital channels.

Takeaways from MLA 2017

I just attended my first Medical Library Association (MLA) Annual Meeting (this year in Seattle, WA), and I came away with a lot of great new ideas, resources, and news from the health sciences information field.  I’m still trying to absorb everything I’ve seen and learned over the past few days, but here’s a quick list of some of my most interesting takeaways from the conference:

  • Open Access Biomedical Journals – The vendor hall offered me the opportunity to explore the online tools and publications available from a variety of biomedical publishers, and I checked around for any open access resources they offered.  A few open access publications and resources I came across include:
  • Data Resources – 
rd3
New data resources portal from NNLM.
  • LibGuides to ExploreI find LibGuides very useful, so I kept an eye out during the poster sessions for any interesting projects related to LibGuides. Two fantastic LibGuides I learned about:
    • Mobile Resources for Health from the University of Florida – Learn about health-related apps, ranging from apps for healthcare professionals (clinical apps, administrative/productivity apps, E-journal and literature database apps, etc.) to apps for patient education.  The LibGuide is mobile-friendly, so learn about healthcare apps on your phone!
    • Disability Resource Guide Disability Resource Guide from University of Illinois – Learn about a variety of physical and mental disabilities, including depictions of the disability in popular literature and media, web/reference/academic resources, and common assistive technologies related to the disability.
  • New Online Learning Portal for MLA – The Medical Library Association recently launched MEDLIB-ED, an online education portal for health information professionals where users can “find, complete, track, and claim credit for educational activities.”  A free competencies self-assessment is available where users can learn about the newly revised MLA Competencies for Lifelong Learning and Professional Success, rate their skills, and use the ratings to plan professional development.
  • Product Updates from National Library of Medicine (NLM) – The NLM provided updates about a number of their free online tools, including:

These are just a few of my favorite highlights, but check Twitter for #MLAnet2017 for more updates and insights on the conference!